Gallery exhibition
Rebecca Campbell
Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Installation photography, Rebecca Campbell, Poltergeist
Rebecca Campbell<br>
I'll Huff and I'll Puff, 2008<br>
      oil on panel<br>
      each small 2 3/8 x 4 in. (6 x 10.2 cm)<br>
      each large 2 3/8 x 8 1/2 in. (6 x 21.6 cm)<br>
      <br>
      Group of 30 bricks (10 rows of two large and one small brick) available, group of 21 (7 rows of two large and one small brick) available,  individual bricks also available
Rebecca Campbell<BR>
Poltergeist, 2009<br>
      oil on wood<br>
      7 1/4 x 71 1/2 in. (18.4 x 181.6 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Rainbow in the Dark (pink), 2008<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      48 x 60 in. (121.9 x 152.4 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Rainbow in the Dark (purple), 2008<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      48 x 53 in. (121.9 x 134.6 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Rainbow in the Dark (green), 2008<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      48 x 36 in. (121.9 x 152.4 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Rainbow in the Dark (dusk), 2009<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      108 x 39 in. (274.3 x 99.1 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Daddy Daughter Date, 2008<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      90 x 67 in. (228.6 x 170.2 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
The Wizard, 2008<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      90 x 74 in. (228.6 x 188 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Top painting:<br>
Highlander (Rebecca), 2009<br>
oil on canvas<br>
82 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (209.6 x 113 cm)<br>
<br>
Bottom painting:<br>
Highlander (Maria), 2009<br>
oil on canvas<br>
82 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (209.6 x 113 cm)<br>
Private collection
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Top painting (left image):<br>
Highlander (Rebecca), 2009<br>
oil on canvas<br>
82 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (209.6 x 113 cm)<br>
<br>
Bottom painting:<br>
Highlander (Maria), 2009<br>
oil on canvas<br>
82 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (209.6 x 113 cm)<br>
Private collection
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Gretel, 2008<br>
      oil on canvas<br>
      96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)<br>
      Private collection
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Liebe Mütti, 2008<br>
      metal; paint; books<br>
      42 x 23 1/4 x 4 in. (106.7 x 59.1 x 10.2 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Romantivist, 2008<br>
      piano keys<br>
      28 1/2 x 48 x 2 in. (72.4 x 121.9 x 5.1 cm)<br>
      Private collection
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Claire de Lune, 2009<br>
      piano keys<br>
      11 1/4 x 13 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (28.6 x 34.3 x 8.9 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
You’ve Come to the Right Place, 2009<br>
      piano keys<br>
      7 1/4 x 10 3/4 x 3 in. (18.4 x 27.3 x 7.6 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Almost Blue, 2009<br>
      piano keys<br>
      11 x 6 1/2 x 2 in. (27.9 x 16.5 x 5.1 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
'A thousand times. Everywhere. Elsewhere.', 2009<br>
      wood; cast metal; glass; DVD<br>
      table: 39 1/2 x 59 x 44 1/2 in. (100.3 x 149.9 x<br>
      113 cm); chair: 36 x 18 x 21 1/2 in. (91.4 x<br>
      45.7 x 54.6 cm); cake on plate: diam: 13; H: 4<br>
      1/2 in. (33 x 11.4 cm); rug: 120 x 84 in. (304.8<br>
      x 213.4 cm); window: 40 x 30 1/2 in. (101.6 x 77.5 cm)
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Do You Really Want to Hurt Me, 2009<br>
      tree: avocado tree, steel, velvet, and fiberglass;<br>
      birds: Windex, glass, and bronze<br>
      overall: 13' x 16 ' x 18'
Rebecca Campbell<br>
Satellite, 2008<br>
      walnut veneered plywood, nickel pated steel string, copper (mixed media assemblage)<br>
      48 x 130 in. (121.9 x 330.2 cm) as installed<br>
      Private collection
26 Feb 2009 - 28 Mar 2009

artist profile

press release


Selected articles

Clothier, Peter. "Art Walk, L.A."
The Huffington Post, 25 March 2009.
full article, PDF

Dambrot, Shana Nys. "Artist profile: Rebecca Campbell"
Art Ltd, p60, January 2009
full article, PDF  

Ollman, Leah. "Memories of a searching spirit"
Los Angeles Times, 6 March 2009.
full article, PDF

Cheng, Scarlet. "A look back to eternity"
Los Angeles Times, 1 March 2009.
full article, PDF

Clark, Erin. "Artist update: Rebecca Campbell"
Artworks magazine, p140, Winter 2008
full article, PDF
 

 
Merriam-Webster defines nostalgia as a combination of the Greek root nostos meaning "return home" and the Old English genesan meaning "to survive." In my current body of work Poltergeist I explore the often sentimentalized and disregarded significance of this experience. In exploring aspects of childhood, memory, and nostalgia I hope to address nostalgia's disruptive effects on linear time and to propose that this phenomenon might be considered under the rubric of an archetypically feminine sublime, as an underestimated strategy for finding meaning in the face of loss and death. For example when a person is having an acute experience of nostalgia, time collapses and the past, the present and the future become one. A nostalgic moment for me might be triggered by a memory of walking through the forest behind my house when I was five but that memory then triggers others, dancing to Boys Don't Cry while drinking black label beer at the Liberty Park, cutting lavender for the dinner table yesterday afternoon and ultimately a sense of the loss of experiences I have yet to have. Time becomes nonlinear and it's both sad and sweet at the same time. Nostalgia somehow enables us to sing along to the tune of our own deaths.

In this work I'm also concerned with the connections and distance between the theoretical and the physical. Inspired by Barthes premise in Pleasure of the Text that "Whence, perhaps, a means of evaluating the works of our modernity: their value would proceed from their duplicity. By which it must be understood that they always have two edges. The subversive edge may seem privileged because it is the edge of violence; but it is not violence which affects pleasure, nor is it destruction which interests it; what pleasure wants is the site of loss, the seam, the cut, the deflation, the dissolve which seizes the subject in the midst of bliss." I am creating works that seek out the seam between ideas and their performance. In specific, theoretical notions of nostalgia, time, and the sublime are considered through physical acts of making paintings, installations, sculptures and films creating documents of these connections and distances. The works of art become artifacts of ideas being processed through experiences and the inevitable distortion that occurs between these ideas and their practice.

Practically speaking, I circumscribe "the midst of bliss" by choosing signs, materials and techniques that give forms to the premise. One notion I am interested in is landscape. The sign I have chosen to represent this with is the tree. Perspectives on nature, wildness and space are examined by animating the tree in various media and interpretive techniques including monumental gestural painting, documentary film footage and life size sculptural construction. The content also unfolds through investment in metaphoric materials. My interest in the nostalgia's transgressive effect on linear time is expressed through the juxtaposition of materials that connote particular and disparate time periods and cultural pedigrees. These materials include, oil paint on canvas, bronze, copper, shag carpet, acrylic paint on drywall, velvet, glass, Windex, etc. The amalgam of these textures allows me to embody my ideas about time without reducing them to a didactic argument. The resonance is one faceted with the familiarity of the body and the fiction of the mind. Marguerite Duras describes these phenomena as "Dreams of another time when the same thing that is going to happen would happen differently. In another way. A thousand times. Everywhere. Elsewhere. Among others, thousands of others who, like ourselves, dream of this time, necessarily. This dream contaminates me."

Rebecca Campbell


Video


Merriam-Webster defines nostalgia as a combination of the Greek root nostos meaning "return home" and the Old English genesan meaning "to survive." In my current body of work Poltergeist I explore the often sentimentalized and disregarded significance of this experience. In exploring aspects of childhood, memory, and nostalgia I hope to address nostalgia's disruptive effects on linear time and to propose that this phenomenon might be considered under the rubric of an archetypically feminine sublime, as an underestimated strategy for finding meaning in the face of loss and death. For example when a person is having an acute experience of nostalgia, time collapses and the past, the present and the future become one. A nostalgic moment for me might be triggered by a memory of walking through the forest behind my house when I was five but that memory then triggers others, dancing to Boys Don't Cry while drinking black label beer at the Liberty Park, cutting lavender for the dinner table yesterday afternoon and ultimately a sense of the loss of experiences I have yet to have. Time becomes nonlinear and it's both sad and sweet at the same time. Nostalgia somehow enables us to sing along to the tune of our own deaths.

In this work I'm also concerned with the connections and distance between the theoretical and the physical. Inspired by Barthes premise in Pleasure of the Text that "Whence, perhaps, a means of evaluating the works of our modernity: their value would proceed from their duplicity. By which it must be understood that they always have two edges. The subversive edge may seem privileged because it is the edge of violence; but it is not violence which affects pleasure, nor is it destruction which interests it; what pleasure wants is the site of loss, the seam, the cut, the deflation, the dissolve which seizes the subject in the midst of bliss." I am creating works that seek out the seam between ideas and their performance. In specific, theoretical notions of nostalgia, time, and the sublime are considered through physical acts of making paintings, installations, sculptures and films creating documents of these connections and distances. The works of art become artifacts of ideas being processed through experiences and the inevitable distortion that occurs between these ideas and their practice.

Practically speaking, I circumscribe "the midst of bliss" by choosing signs, materials and techniques that give forms to the premise. One notion I am interested in is landscape. The sign I have chosen to represent this with is the tree. Perspectives on nature, wildness and space are examined by animating the tree in various media and interpretive techniques including monumental gestural painting, documentary film footage and life size sculptural construction. The content also unfolds through investment in metaphoric materials. My interest in the nostalgia's transgressive effect on linear time is expressed through the juxtaposition of materials that connote particular and disparate time periods and cultural pedigrees. These materials include, oil paint on canvas, bronze, copper, shag carpet, acrylic paint on drywall, velvet, glass, Windex, etc. The amalgam of these textures allows me to embody my ideas about time without reducing them to a didactic argument. The resonance is one faceted with the familiarity of the body and the fiction of the mind. Marguerite Duras describes these phenomena as "Dreams of another time when the same thing that is going to happen would happen differently. In another way. A thousand times. Everywhere. Elsewhere. Among others, thousands of others who, like ourselves, dream of this time, necessarily. This dream contaminates me."

-Rebecca Campbell
back to the top
top